Acorn

Acorn – Achievement – Nine of Nuts (Pentacles)

Genus: Quercus – Family: Fagaceae

Acorn signals a time of achievement. We have reached a point in our life where we can now appreciate the beauty and abundance that we have been nurturing.

In Celtic and Druidic cultures, acorns were considered sacred because they held the “seed” of the mighty oak. Acorns were exchanged as secret signals between druids as a way to “know” each other. The name Druid, (teacher/mystic) is based on the Proto-Indo-European words daru (tree & truth) and vid (wisdom). Druids ingested acorns to merge with the wisdom of an oak tree.

“Acorn” comes from the Celtic words “ac” for oak and “korn” for kernel. “Ac” is based on Ansuz, a Rune of the Elder Futhark in the Proto-Germanic language.  Ansuz meant the breath or mouth of an oak or ash. The Germanic Saxon’s later split the Ansuz rune into three sounds: “o” (mouth), “ac” (oak) and “ae” (ash). “Korn” originated in the Eleusinian mystery schools of Ancient Greece.

Kore, also known as Persephone, was the daughter of Demeter (Goddess of Agriculture) and Zeus (Sky God).  Since oak trees were sacred to both, acorns represent the seed and the fruit of the mighty oak “gods”. In Norse legend, Thor (Sky God of Lightening) sought shelter under a large oak during a thunderstorm. This in turn led to the tradition of placing acorns on windowsills to prevent a house from being hit by lightning. Acorns were commonly worn as amulets of protection, good luck and abundance.

Acorns first appear on adult trees starting at the age of 20 to 50 years old, which makes acorns a symbol of patience and achievement. A mature oak can produce more than 2000 acorns a year but only one in 10,000 acorns will grow to become an oak. This speaks to the perseverance it takes to achieve our goals.

Acorns themselves are made up of a smooth hard outer shell (pericarp) with a woody cap (cupule) perched on top. The edible oak nut is found within the shell. Their fairy-like appearance has inspired the imaginations of children around the world.

Acorn nuts are gathered as a food source. They can be cooked, placed in soup, or dried and ground into flour. Acorns can be stored for up to two years and used when needed. The white oak, Quercus alba is the most sought-after producer of acorns due to their nuttier, sweeter taste and lower tannin content.

Message: Acorn reminds us to stay humble even during times of great achievement. This is a time to embrace the art of self-sufficiency, self-discipline and self-control. As we master these aspects of life we begin to flow in harmony with the natural rhythms of nature. Acorns appearance suggests that we are about to sprout a new plan or that a new opportunity will appear before us.

Challenge: Being loud or indiscreet. Not able to keep secrets especially those that could impact others.

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